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roadtrips.010There are few things more wonderful in this world than a road trip. The anticipation of the vacation finally coming to a start, generally the many hours of build up you have traveling the road, anxious to reach the destination you’ve been so longing for.

I feel road trips are making a come back too, in a big way, as is the simplicity of a family vacation. Every family creates a different sort of tradition for the time spent on their well traveled paths.

For our family, road trips started with a hearty McDonald’s breakfast, a backseat full of pillows, a bag of Starburst, and country musics original greats on the radio. The many traveled hours took us from the largest interstates to the tiniest small town squares, and all the while we played games as a family.

“Car Bingo” was absolutely a favorite – a retro cardboard square with tiny plastic windows pushed closed when we spotted a cow, an airplane, a firetruck. “The License Plate” game was on-going … the excitement of finding a road-mate from some far-off place like Hawaii, Alaska or Kansas was unimaginable.  And last but not least, the most-played “Alphabet Game” is one that never gets old – broken into “teams” trying desperately to find the Q’s and X’s before the other team and hating when our travels led us off the beaten path where it seemed no letters existed in the world as our game came to an unfinished end.

Road trips are not soon forgotten. The traditions continue through the generations, the memories continue.

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Create family traditions of your own. Give the gift of IceMilk Aprons.

picture-1In honor of the Masters this week, here is a wonderful and time honored traditional recipe for Pimento Cheese.

Because of my passion for traditions and recipes, an obvious question I posed .. where does this tradition of serving pimento cheese sandwiches at the Masters come from anyways?

The answer is delightful. In true Southern fashion, families in the South generally had to eat what they grew on their own farms – fruits, vegetables, grains. At that, very few Southern farms made their own cheese, and when they did it was white cheese, like ricotta or mozzarella. Yellow cheese was a delicacy for Southerners, and thus generally reserved for the upper class or special occasions.

That being said, they took the precious yellow cheese, added mayonnaise (again, in true Southern fashion) and pimentos which were grown locally across the South to make the fine spread. The Masters, being the epitome of golf and of the elite, began the time-honored tradition of serving the pimento cheese sandwich – which is one of their most popular by far.

Do enjoy!

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